DOGS AND CHILDREN
 

DO NOT EVER LEAVE ANY DOG (OR PUPPY) OF WHATEVER BREED-TYPE, SIZE, GENDER, TEMPERAMENT AND LEVEL OF TRAINING ALONE OR UNSUPERVISED TOGETHER WITH ANY CHILD. WE SIMPLY CANNOT EXPECT YOUNG CHILDREN TO REMEMBER ALL THE DO's AND DON'Ts OF CANINE-HUMAN INTERACTIONS. 

  • The movements and noises children make such as, for example, flapping and jerking of limbs, crying and running about are all somewhat reminiscent of prey animals which may awaken your puppy’s prey-drive or even scare him which could easily lead to a tragic and possibly even fatal misunderstandings.
  • Please do not engage, or allow anyone else (child or adult) to engage in rough-house/wrestling-type games with your puppy. Stress levels can easily get too high during this type of play and then play-aggression can turn into real aggression in an instant. 
  • Do take time to teach your children how to interact with dogs and puppies and do not allow your children to pester and, in particular, ‘corner’ your puppy. Teach your child that dogs and puppies do not like their tails or ears pulled and they do not like hugging either or crayons put into their ears! Although it is very rare that a dog attacks without any warning, children … and most adults … are generally not capable of interpreting and responding correctly to warning signals or challenges.
  • Always ensure that your puppy has an escape-route so he can get away from a child that frightens or annoys him.
  • Older dogs, high-ranking individuals and, in particular, intact males may not be as accepting of children as other dogs are and may attempt to reprimand children for pulling, hitting or pushing them.
  • A dog or puppy towering over a child gives the dog a height advantage. It may “think” your child is another dog or puppy and interact with your child much as he would with another dog or puppy and that may include behaviours such as standing-over, growling and/or even nipping the child. Bear in mind that other dog and puppies instinctively know how to react to such behaviour but your child does not and tragic accidents can easily happen.
  • If your puppy / dog jumps up or otherwise pester your child, teach your child how to "be-a-tree"
    • Plant your roots (feet) firmly on the ground - spread legs slightly to be better able to balance.
    • Fold you branches (arms) in front of you
    • Then look at your roots grow and totally ignore the puppy - puppies quickly get tired of interacting with trees that do not interact back :-)
    • If the dog or puppy is large, practice this exercise on-leash
 

 
 
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